Exploring the Northern Dimension

Maritime activities in the Baltic Sea assessed in HELCOM report

HELCOM released in March 2018 the most comprehensive assessment of maritime activities in the Baltic Sea region currently available – covering distribution of activities at sea, developments over time, related environmental issues as well as future perspectives and scenarios. The vast number of activities addressed include operational and accidental pollution from maritime traffic, fisheries, aquaculture, offshore energy production, cables and pipelines, submerged hazardous objects, and leisure boating.

Read the HELCOM Maritime Assessment 2018here.

NCM Publication: Baltic 2030 Bumps on the Road: How the Baltic Sea States are performing on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

The report Baltic 2030: Bumps on the Road provides an overview of the 2030 Agenda implementation in the Baltic Sea Region, aimed at informing strategy and prioritisation discussions for national and regional collaboration. For each of the region’s eleven countries, performance on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is examined and five selected SDGs are discussed at the indicator level. Based on this analysis, the authors recommend seven avenues for action where greater collaboration in the region can support SDG achievement. The report was commissioned by the Council of the Baltic Sea States (CBSS) and is jointly published by CBSS and the Nordic Council of Ministers (NCM). It was drafted by the advisory firm Nordic Sustainability and follows the previous Bumps on the Road to 2030 report published by the NCM in 2017.
 

NCM published Nordic Bioeconomy Programme: 15 Action Points for Sustainable Change

Nordic Council of Ministers and Nordic Council of Ministers Secretariat have published the Nordic Bioeconomy Programme: 15 Action Points for Sustainable Change, which combines environmental, social and economic ambitions for a more sustainable Region. The bioeconomy is of fundamental importance to the national economies of the Nordic countries, and especially important for rural development in large parts of the Region. The programme aims to create new industries and value chains and to facilitate and guide the transition of bio-based industries into technology advanced industries, and to optimise the production and value creation of biomass. The programme sets out a vision for the Nordic bioeconomy based on four pillars:
  • competitive bio-based industries
  • sustainable resource management
  • resilient and diverse ecosystems
  • inclusive economic development
To reach this vision, the programme defines 15 action points under three thematic areas: Innovate – Accelerate – Network. The focus is on development of new policies on regional, national and Nordic level, for increased funding, better education, labelling and certificates, bioeconomy clusters and several other areas. The programme also contains an appendix with sustainability principles that can be seen as a step towards developing common ground and good practices for a sustainable bioeconomy in the Nordic Region.
 
Read the Programme at the NCM website.
 

ND Newsflash 1/2016 is published

The latest issue of ND Newsflash 1/2016 is published on March, 2016.  

ND Newsflash gives a floor to ND actors and their stakeholders to raise their voice in topical issues close to their heart within the ND thematic focus areas. In the ND Newsflash a broad scope of viewpoints is presented ranging from ND Partnerships, ND Business Council, academic actors, policy makers and NGOs.

Read the ND Newsflash 1/2016

NDI Policy Brief 10: Symbolic resources of the Russian North in the global experience economy

This Policy Brief gives recommendations for the development of cultural products and creative entrepreneurship in the Russian North through the conceptual lenses of symbolic resources and the experience economy. The global experience economy has changed the value chain logic of the cultural market from the traditional production and consumption of creative products and services into co-creation of cultural experiences. This co-creation implies that symbolic resources, such as the cultural heritage, are interpreted in a novel way that transforms them into experiences connected to time and place. Cultural projects, which started in the Russian North-West in late 1990s and follow the logic of the experience economy, have proved their sustainability on the regional and global cultural scenes. Their success is explained by common features of the artistic content and organizational models. These features include the artistic interpretation of Northern cultural symbols and the formation of comfortable spaces for creative interaction of actors with different backgrounds.

Maryin Dom 1

Opening of the artistic residence "Maryin Dom" in Shakola village, photo by Irina Efimova

The Policy Brief gives the following recommendations:

Recommendation 1. New visions of the Northern Russian heritage as the valuable resource for cultural innovation should be promoted and supported in the spheres of service design, creative tourism and event management.

Recommendation 2. Creative places of the Russian North hosting experimental art activities, as well as traditional cultural and commercial events need to be promoted as powerful territorial brands.

Recommendation 3. Applied research on management and organizational issues of the “unorthodox” cultural products development and on the implementation of hybrid symbolic meanings to the traditional landscapes will help to share the best practices of cultural entrepreneurship.

 

The Policy Brief can be downloaded here.

For more information, please contact the author:

Anna Soloveva, professor at the World History Department, Northern Arctic Federal University, Arkhangelsk, Russia, a.soloveva[at]narfu.ru

 

NDI Policy Brief 7: Systemic biomonitoring needed to mitigate Arctic health risks

Northern Dimension Institute Policy Brief 7 - December 2019

Systemic biomonitoring needed to mitigate Arctic health risks

This Policy Brief highlights the need for biomonitoring to assess the risks of public health disorders and negative demographic implications caused by the ingestion of hazardous pollutants into the human body. These pollutants can accumulate in food chains and spread with migratory species of commercial fish, birds and wild animals. Consequences of climate change increase the ingestion risks, and the dependence of indigenous peoples on the resources in their environment makes them particularly vulnerable. Hence, relevance of this issue for Russia and the Arctic countries is obvious and requires attention.

The mitigation of negative effects of climate change on the health of indigenous people in the Arctic requires the establishment of systemic biomonitoring at the legislative level.

Indigenous

The monitoring must

  • be implemented on a regular basis
  • take into account not only the effect of pollutants to the body, but also the deficiency of vital trace elements, such as iodine, iron, magnesium, etc., which are essential for the proper functioning of the body.
  • include chemical analysis of environmental samples, animals and birds, which indigenous peoples consume, as well as human biological samples (urine, blood, breast milk, hair, teeth).

Download the Policy Brief Systemic biomonitoring needed to mitigate Arctic health risks

Feel free to contact the team of authors at the Arctic Biomonitoring Laboratory, Northern Arctic Federal University, Arkhangelsk, Russia, for more information:

Tatiana Sorokinat.sorokina[at]narfu.ru

Anna Trofimova a.trofimova[at]narfu.ru

Julia Varakina yu.andreeva[at]nsrfu.ru

 

 

 

NDI Policy Brief 9: Preventing premature deaths in the Northern Dimension area

This policy brief reports key findings of a study carried ot by the NDPHS Expert Group for Non-communicable diseases. The study analyzed official mortality data on premature deaths under 70 years of age in eight countries in the Northern Dimension area (Belarus, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Sweden) and found that the PYLL rate (“Potential Years of Life Lost”) differs considerably among ND area countries. A striking feature is its gender difference, being on average 2.5 times higher for men than for women. Most of this difference is due to external causes of death such as suicides and traffic accidents. Alcohol-related causes also have a heavy male over-representation. The general development in public health outcome was however good in 2003-2013, resulting in average 26% PYLL reduction. Encouraging trends include decrease in losses caused by vascular (heart) diseases, cancer and external causes, such as suicides and alcohol related causes, in all ND countries that participated in the study.

PYLL figure

The results of the study led to the following recommendations:

  • Recommendation 1. Premature mortality can be prevented effectively by designing and implementing health and economic policies on health promotion and disease prevention. Evidence based treatment of diseases also makes a difference, but is less effective than prevention of diseases and accidents.
  • Recommendation 2. Positive changes in male health behavior has an immediate decreasing effect on overall premature mortality. Policies should be targeted towards improving traffic and occupational safety, and decreasing harmful use of alcohol.
  • Recommendation 3. Public health strategies should be intersectoral and involve all stakeholders. Practicing Health in All Policies (HiAP), promoting healthy lifestyles and holistic healthcare are crucial for preventing and avoiding many of premature deaths.
  • Recommendation 4. PYLL rate was selected in 2015 as the indicator to measure the progress of the current 2016-2020 Strategy of the NDPHS. Continuing this practice in the renewed strategy beyond 2020 is highly recommended. The ongoing ND PYLL-2 study should also pre-assess the 2020 COVID-19 caused years of life lost in order to evaluate its burden on the public health of populations.
  • Recommendation 5.Health policy makers are invited to discuss the results of the PYLL-2 study, launched by the NDPHS NCD Expert Group in 2020, in workshops that will be organized in 2021 in selected NDPHS countries.

The Policy Brief can be downloaded here

For more information contact the author Mikko Vienonen, NDPHS/NCD Expert Group, vienonen.m.[at]gmail.com


NDPC Annual report 2015

The NDPC Annual report is based on the NDPC Action Plan 2015, adopted by NDPC Steering Committee on March 24-25, 2015 in Helsinki. The Action Plan follows the overall aims of the NDPC set forth by the NDPC Memorandum of Understanding of May 20, 2010 and the NDPC strategy for 2012-2016. The NDPC also bases its work on the NDI report 11 Dimensions: Cultural and Creative Industry Policy Development and Practices within the Area of NDPC (2015).

Please read the resport on NDPC website.

NDPHS e-Newsletter 1/2015 is published

This issue of the NDPHS e-Newsletter updates about the strategic planning processes, which were carried out during 2014 and 2015: the NDPHS Strategy 2020 and the EUSBSR Action Plan have both been adopted. Their main goals and implications for the future are presented in two articles.

NDPHS e-Newsletters can be downloaded from the the NDPHS website.

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